How to Get ELL Students to Talk-6 Story Telling Apps

I know when I was an English Language Learner (ELL) instructor, getting students to speak in front of others, was my greatest challenge.  Mind/Shift not only addresses this challenge for educators, but recommends some fantastic storytelling apps for all three grade levels (elementary, middle, secondary) to ease their anxiety.

“With digital storytelling tools, students can spend time formulating their stories, self-reflect and self-assess, collaborate with peers of differing skill levels, and in the end, feel confident in their abilities.”

Kid in Story Book Maker (elementary)

Tell About This (elementary/middle)

ShadowPuppet Edu (elementary/middle)

Toontastic (elementary/middle)

VoiceThread (elementary/middle/secondary)

Explain Everything (middle/secondary)

“Apps and tech tools allow students to practice in the comfort of their own home by themselves or with a caregiver.”

Direct Link:  http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/08/31/6-storytelling-apps-that-get-english-language-learners-talking/

   

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138 Practical Ed Tech Tip Videos

Free Technology for Teachers organized a cumulative list of 138 fabulous, easy to follow videos aimed “at tools for flipping your classroom, videos on managing workflow, social media tips, search strategies, and media production.”  But one does not have to be a teacher to find some of these quite useful.

Many of the tools or videos are aimed at assisting anyone using Google docs or apps.  3 Helpful Google Drive Settings is just one of those videos.

This is a definite resource for everyone to bookmark!

Teacher Recommended: 50 Favorite Classroom Apps

Librarian Michelle Luhtala, from New Canaan High School, hosts an Emerging Tech webinar on edWeb; with a large professional learning network of educators, Michelle compiles this great list.

This list of apps is among ones educators favored and shared some commonalities with from last year’s favorites on edWeb.  Teachers tend to drop apps if they become too expensive or sometimes if the updates are so overwhelming that they no longer know how to use the product. Luhtala explained it’s a delicate balance: “If it doesn’t feel different than it did a year ago, that’s alarming. It should feel the same, but better.”

The repeat apps that have made it to this favorite list added functionality without doing so too quickly. They also tend to target younger students — high school students mostly use their phones for personal computing and their laptops for school. The emphasis in the higher grades is still on reading and typing — teachers give students fewer opportunities to express their learning in creative ways, so the tools of choice tend to be basic. High school kids use Google Apps because they can easily collaborate.